Car Tech Manual

For asking and answering questions regard the NZ Hobby Car Tech Manual.

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spiderman
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Car Tech Manual

Post by spiderman » Sat Dec 24, 2011 2:38 pm

Hi Guys,
Where can I get a copy of the "Car Tech Manual"? Is there a version that I can download?
The reason I ask is that I may bring my part built Locost down with me, if I ever get my visa's sorted out and find myself a job and get my arse down to NZ, and I will need to know what I would have to do to get my project registered.

Many thanks.
Spider.

bzrse7en
Posts: 1467
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Location: Rolleston Canterbury

Re: Car Tech Manual

Post by bzrse7en » Sat Dec 24, 2011 6:17 pm

It isn't downloadable anymore and will cost about $250.
I don't know what stage yours is at, but I, and others should be able to answer specific questions.
I think suspension material and welding is the main difference between here and the UK.

spiderman
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Re: Car Tech Manual

Post by spiderman » Thu Dec 29, 2011 10:53 am

Hi bzrse7en,
I have pretty much completed my Locost but I beleive I need to have it registered and in my ownership for 12 months to avoid having it tested in NZ before I can get it registered for the road. However if I manage to get the offer of employment before the 12 months is up I may move sooner and would need to have my car tested in NZ. I am lead to believe that some extra bracing may be required in the chassis and that the welding of the wishbones will need crack testing.
Are there any other areas that you think I may need to address for registration? Is the welding of the chassis crack tested? I think the only other option would be to leave the car here untill the 12 months is up and then return to pack it up and bring it down later.

Many thanks.
Spider.

P.S. $250 seems a bit steep for the manual, does that include the cost of the test? If not how much is the test and what is the test called.

bzrse7en
Posts: 1467
Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 3:40 pm
Location: Rolleston Canterbury

Re: Car Tech Manual

Post by bzrse7en » Thu Dec 29, 2011 12:29 pm

Does that include the test??....Ha Ha, that's funny. Sorry Spider ;)

It is a very comprehensive manual, about 3" thick and is updated regularly. In saying that, not everything in there is pertinent to a Seven.
Our LVVTA test normally consists of 2 vists during construction from a certifier and then a final inspection. It is similar to our home built aeroplane inspection system.
I think the total cost of the three inspections is about $1500. I think you wouldn't need this if your car was registered in the UK first.
As your car is already built (but not registered in UK), it would only require the final inspection. I cannot recall the final inspection cost, about $700 maybe.
I can see a problem with this thou, as a NZ certifier has different rules to the UK, he might spot items of concern and ask for them to be changed, this is much easier on a part built car, and this is the reason for the 3 inspections.
Chassis doesn't need crack testing, but welds would most likely need to be visually checked.
Chassis material min is 1.6mm wall.
I doubt any more diagonals will need to be added, in Ozzy they do to meet torsion and beam tests (which we don't do).
Suspension must be TIG welded and a crack test certificate supplied for certification.
Minimum material thickness for A arms is 19x 1.6 wall for top A arms, and 22x2.5mm wall for bottom. Although they would rather you use 25x2 wall tube, the manual states the lighter stuff is marginal and only allowed on a light weight lotus seven type car.
They are quite stringent on bump steer.
You need a collapsible steering column,
Seat belt anchorages of 3mm steel and with a minimum area (cannot recall amount).
All safety gear, lights, seatbelts etc.. E marked, or similar spec.
There are impact zones in the passenger areas, so no protrusions.

The car can then get a Vin number and special LVVTA chassis plate.

After this the car goes thru compliance, which is a glorified MOT test, at which time number plates are issued.
If your car has been used in the UK, the compliance is more stringent and they can take brakes apart, for a peek inside amongst other checks. I was quoted $2000+ for this.

I'd recommend to you that your car should be a tidy example to be worth the shipping and other costs plus the dicking around.

Patrick

spiderman
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Re: Car Tech Manual

Post by spiderman » Thu Dec 29, 2011 1:33 pm

Hi Patrick,
Your tests + Compliance costs $1500+$2000? and we complain in the UK at the cost of a single IVA test costing £490 ($960). As far as things go here in the UK it is much cheaper to be a petrolhead, donor cars are much cheaper ( an mot'd car can be had for as little as £300 ) and the hoops we have to jump through less stringent and cheaper. Although I think our test are not quite as relevent to safty as yours, yours seem too be more on structural integrity and ours seem to concentrate mainly upon sharp edges not scratching or cutting anyone who ventures within 2m of the vehicle, they dont care that you may burn yourself against a red hot exhaust as long as it does not scratch you.
It looks like my best option is to complete my vehicle, get it registered and bring it down in 12 months, as I do not wish to get rid of it as I have built it from scratch by my own fair hand and I think It will be one I am never going to sell. I will also bring down my GT6 MK2 when I come down so my vehicle cost for transport and registration is going to be a major cost in my emigration, along with bringing my dog and all the costs that will incur, if he is still alive by the time I have saved enough to move as he is 12yrs old now. Better start saving a bit more money each month then.

Thanks for the heads up on the costs and whats involved.

I suppose I could get a larger container and ship parts over to sell or for others who want parts/spares shipping to help offset the transport costs.

Better pull my finger out, get my Locost finished and start planning a move before I get to old to qualify for residency.

I hope you and all your family and friends are okay after the recent earthquake events in Christchurch, it must be hard on the nerves not knowing if or when there are anymore on the way.

All the best to you and yours and hope you have a prosperous and peaceful New year.

Spider

bzrse7en
Posts: 1467
Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 3:40 pm
Location: Rolleston Canterbury

Re: Car Tech Manual

Post by bzrse7en » Thu Dec 29, 2011 3:22 pm

I have only recently bought the Hobby car manual, and although it is long, it is actually well written and not a hardship to read.
What I have read so far, all of the rules seem logical, and it clearly states that scratch builts are not subjected to the same standards as modern production cars. The manual was instigated by the NZ hotrod ass and then other organizations got on board, such as NZ car manufacturers, sports car clubs, trike builders, car modifiers for the disabled etc.. Standards are negotiated with the government when new new-car legislation comes in. It is written by a hotrodder.
I know the UK rules are oddly loose for home built cars and for a Euro union member.
At least neither of our countries are like Ozzy, their sevens have to meet the same Australian design rules as production cars, including emissions. I understand their engines must be within 5 years old when the car is complete. How you know that when you start, I am not sure.

We are fine with the quake, the west of the city has been barely touched since the first September 2010 quake, and quake activity is going eastwards. I am sure the media might portray things differently, with total devastation and liquifaction all over the place. Some people are having it tough thou, so thanks for your words.

7dreamer
Posts: 427
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 10:26 am
Location: Invercargill

Re: Car Tech Manual

Post by 7dreamer » Thu Dec 29, 2011 4:09 pm

From wat ive heard and understand New Zealand sort of adopted the best of the rest of the worlds home built car rules so that we end up with cars that are safe for every one involved the tech manual is dear but its worth every penny if you use it properly.

kiwia110
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2009 7:10 am

Re: Car Tech Manual

Post by kiwia110 » Wed May 28, 2014 6:58 pm

If you join one of the member clubs whoa are a party to the process the manual can be substantially cheaper. Constructors, Sports Car Club etc

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